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  • #50589

    BassMon
    Grom

    Didn’t see this thread resurrected here, going through some thoughts in my head.

    Many of you know im in the HVAC/R field. I like it. I make good money. I can’t complain. But working for someone else is a drag man. I wanted to start my own company at one point but as time goes on, I’m not sure it’s what i want to do. For years iv been messing with the idea of opening a restaurant. The unique places in my area do really well. I service and install equipment in alot of them and have seen the behind the scenes. I think me and my wife could pull it off. She’s a whizz when it comes to creative food and drink ideas. We’re always cooking and refining recipes. I already work on all that kitchen/refrigeration/exhaust equipment. Got a buddy who is a damn good brewer but doesn’t have a legit spot.

    Thinking of going for broke. Go big or go home. Get a place that has room for my buddy to brew, serve all local and in house beer. Get a chef to work out a menu with my wife. Im not a business man. Would have to figure out what im doing as far as that goes.

     

    Just wondering if anyone here has any experience owning a restaurant. I know it’s tough and i won’t be making millions. But if it is successful i could surf whenever. I just turned 30 last month. If i want to live the life i want to live i got to make a move in the near future.

     

    Thoughts? Advice? Take the risk? Play it safe and stick with what i got? Anyone in the business with any words of wisdom?

    #50592

    BarryCuda
    Grom

    “Im not a business man.”….you state. Restaurant, yes, it is food, drinks, etc.

    But it is a BRUTAL business. So then…..interview restaurant owners and get the low down and advice on your self declared weakness- the BUSINESS side of things. You will then be shoring up your strengths if you do so. Work on the weakest link before you jump into it. remember, restaurants are plentiful–you will have lots of competition; you therefore need to be better than they are on the business side. Food and drinks are subjective; business is NOT.

    If you do it–best of luck. Call a meal the “BarryCuda Plate” (spicy, with different rices.!) lol

    #50593

    Yankee
    Grom

    My ex-wife, the evil one, wanted to open a restaurant. She was a Trini & great cook. She said she would run the place & I’d handle the numbers due to my biz mind.

    I said ok. Great idea on the surface of it. Let’s look at the full picture, then think it over, then decide.

    You will have zero wknds off. That’s when you make your money to sustain the place being open the rest of the week. You will have zero holidays off. That’s when folks want to eat out. You will have major staff turnover. It’s the nature of the food & bev industry. You will have internal theft problems. You will have employees calling off work or just not showing up without even calling off work. You will have to tend bar, wait tables, cook, clean up people’s vomit, and more. Your biggest never-ending job will be managing humans. You will be personally on the hook for a long lease. You will spend steep amounts of money building out your restaurant w the setting you want as well as kitchen fixtures are very expensive. You will be dealing with frequent inspections from state & local govts. You will be running a business in one of the most competitive fields in the USA.

    She took a look at me when I finished & said “no vacations?” Nope. And that was the end of that 🙂

    A friend of mine always had a dream, to open an English pub in Orlando. And he was a Brit, too! He finally pulled the trigger, quit his 6-figure job as food & bev manager at a huge hotel chain, opened up a pub place there in Kissimmee area.

    Within 18 months he dumped it. For a loss. And he was happy to get out. Said it was the worst thing he’d ever done. I still recall him telling me how waitresses would call off shifts at the last moment due to they had their periods & couldn’t come to work. He also said he would have to be closing @ 2am, and then back @ 7am to receive the morning deliveries of produce. He said a lot of employees steal, cash, booze, food products.

    I would say that if you’re hell bent on this concept, do a food truck. You limit your losses if it goes south. You work out the food kinks as you go & you have minimal staffing issues. Control theft by not accepting cash, only plastic. You find out if there is a market for your product. You develop a customer base. You learn the biz. You learn the ins & outs of local govt permitting & taxation & health codes processes, which are often onerous. If there are days when you cannot run the truck, or you want to go surfing, at least you (likely) won’t go bankrupt.

    Another buddy of mine & his wife ran a Neapolitan pizza food truck for 3 years. Hugely popular. But they still dealt with everything I mentioned above when they opened their restaurant. It was tough sledding, particularly w the personnel aspects. They are now doing well. Their pizzeria is consistently rated top-100 USA & they have opened two other locations. They have assembled investor money & are attempting to franchise. Time will tell.

    • Last modifed 1 week, 2 days ago
    #50595

    Yankee
    Grom

    My background, in case you’re wondering, is 5 yrs on Wall St in NYC & LA as commodities trader. Chucked that. Toted a toolbox, just me & my brother, as physical security guys for a few yrs. Started hiring people cause we couldn’t handle all the work. Made every HR mistake known to man. Made lots of mistakes in every aspect. Didn’t take a ‘real’ vacay for many years. Put everything back in to the biz. But, here I am yrs later, almost 50 employees, stable & growing biz, spits off cash, 100% debt free & the last time I actually worked from a toolbox was 20-something yrs ago.

    I say all this because you’re on the right track imho. Meaning, working for yourself will garner you wealth. If you avoid the deep traps & big land mines along the way. Nothing in Life and Biz is risk-free. Nothing. If you close the windows of disaster & open the windows of opportunity, emphasis on the former, you will be a financial winner.

    There’s a lot of money to be made in any service biz in America. HVAC, if you’re good at it…. Huge money. A customer base that is rapidly growing without you having to run high costs of customer acquisition. The trick is this, if you want to make large coin: you have to run multiple revenue platforms, i.e., service trucks. And the trick to doing that is being able to manage people. Keep all the campers happy in the sandbox, overpay them, have superb bennies & you will rock the world.

    Then open your restaurant 🙂

    #50599

    BarryCuda
    Grom

    Bassman…Yankee saved you the time of having to interview lots of business people. Listened and follow his advice.

    I agree 100% that the most important is managing people- probably the most difficult as well.

    He has said it well. Good advice Yankee.

    #50600

    BassMon
    Grom

    Barry i was actually going to take a business class. Even if i went the HVAC route, it will be somthing i need.

     

    And yank, i hear you. I worked in restaurants while i was putting myself through college and now i work in restaurants for HVAC constantly. Iv seen all that you mentioned. I know it wouldn’t be pretty. The one thing that would really set us apart is having a in house brewer. I live in a “hip” little town that does alot of local business type events. One being a farmer’s market. My idea was to get a booth at the farmers market, see if there’s interest and if we can get a following. From there maybe a good truck before going all out.

     

    Im really just spit balling. One thing that would help. In this town you can’t buy a normal store like clothes or whatever and convert it to a restaurant. If you buy a spot that was a restaurant, it needs to become a restaurant. This helps because it would need less work, in theory. As well as all that kitchen equipment that’s expensive, don’t need to hire a company. That’s what i do.

     

    Let me ask you this though yank, how did you start your own company? Obviously id have to start small working myself. 1 service truck, maybe 2. Well if you start out that way how do you not piss off customers, you’r only one guy and can only be in one place at a time. Do you do side jobs and get customers, then open shop? Or open shop and slowly take on customers?

     

    That HVAC business idea is still bouncing around in the old noggin. What scared me away from it was the above questions. Stay small or hire guys and step back? I feel like id have trouble hiring other guys. Not sure if id trust their work, or how to know if i could. Being as you’ve been there and have done it, just curious how you went about opening shop?

     

    I appreciate the insight. Very much so.

    #50607

    JB, I’ve had a lot of good business minded people in my life and I swear to you – they all are echos of Yank. Exactly what Robins father would tell you and he was a guy who went from selling encyclopedias to being President of his own 35 million a year company showing people how to be efficient in business. From the ground up. Take yanks viewpoint and apply it like a general litmus test to your ideas and write down pros and cons and BE HONEST with yourself about the answers. Dont try to convince yourself to do something by ignoring your own truths, that’s the biggest trap of all. Me? I were you, stick to your strength and build up a two truck Service company with a reliable like minded partner or employee – one that’s truly invested in your company,treat them like gold, and save your duggets for a few years, and then get another truck and another like minded employee… and as I said to you before, I have a great guy to get the Cliff Notes for starting a hugely successful yet MANAGEABLE hvac company that isn’t a time/life eater. Then when your seasoned a bit with business acumen, then you look at other ideas – you’ll also have some money and more importantly, business credit, to maybe try one without loosing everything you’ve worked for. But one things above ALL – don’t take peoples hard truth advice and let it sour your heart and mind towards wanting what your talking about because that’s how most people give up and never do anything in their lives. Take it from one who has done exactly that.

    • Last modifed 1 week, 2 days ago
    #50610

    Some good advise being posted. My suggestion would be to talk to the people who have already accomplished what you want to accomplish and who have what you want in life and take their advise.

    Successful people generally copy off other successful people. Success principles are universal and generally stay the same for long periods of time.

    Ask yourself what you really want out of life. Is it money? Is it time? In my opinion time is more valuable than money. No matter how much money you make, if you don’t have the time to enjoy it and the freedom to do what you want when you want (for the most part), then you are just a slave to the wage.

    It’s called lifestyle. You have to decide what kind you want to have. Working non stop was never appealing to me. If it’s for a short period of time to get to a point where you slow back down and enjoy the fruits of your labor then sure, that’s ok, but don’t get stuck in that rut of always working and never playing or enjoying your life.

    Life is not about how hard you can work, it’s about doing the things that make you the most happy, as often as possible and sharing those things with the people you love and helping those people do the things that they love and sharing those experiences together.

    Time is limited, just remember that. Nobody will care how many A/C installs or repairs you did when you are gone. But they’ll remember how you lived your life.

    #50611

    BassMon
    Grom

    100% DP, and that’s exactly how im looking at it. Im a work horse. It might sound cocky, but it’s not. I just know me. Whatever route i take, I’ll get it done. I just got to figure out the how.

     

    Working constantly like i do now is a drag because I’m not getting to the point where i can enjoy the fruits of my labor. As long as i have money to survive and live, I’m good. It’s the time i want. This is why i started straying from the HVAC business idea. I see bosses working non stop. Which is not what i want.

     

    Appreciate all the advice, insight, and opinions. Gets the wheels in my head turning and thinking of things i havnt before.

    #50618

    BASSMON,

    Yankee been there done that, valuable business experience, I’ve told him he’s done very well for himself, when you can fly to Costa 4 or 5 times a year what’s not to like being entrepreneur.

    I had a good run of my career in the financial industry, lending millions of dollars every day, from the commercial side of the business, new “start ups” were considered risky. The success rate on new restaurant start ups statistically is lower than the national average of lets say HVAC business venture. Thinking beyond restaurant location, square footage costs, leasing contracts, lawyer fees, city/county permits, construction costs, liability insurance/workmen’s comp insurance takes a toll on initial borrowing for capital expenditures. Be careful, don’t sign away your financial security for collateral without investigating some of the Federal programs from Small Business Administration.

    An example, Chicken Filet is on top of fast food franchises to purchase which requires 1 million dollars of liquidity to manage the business operation for 2 years which is double of most food franchises. Please forgive me if I’m a little cautious, if Yankee has not taken the plunge we wouldn’t be reading about his surfing adventures. What’s so ironic for Yankee, myself and others on Mostoke ended up making a career in a completely different field than their degree or their “dream” job. My dream job was working @ the C.I.A. with my wife, that would have been so Kool & exciting, chose another career path and paid off much better dividends as living the “dream” now in my own way.

    What about a HVAC business venture, you know the business so well then utilize its success to feed the restaurant business venture with its capital limiting your personal financial exposure that way you always have a back up. If the restaurant takes off, open 2 then 3 then sell the HVAC and live the dream, it just takes a little longer to get there but your young enough …………………….

     

    #50627

    LBCrew
    Grom

    Worked in restaurants my whole life until about 15 years ago… if you can believe that. It’s a young man’s game. I’m good friends with a guy who owns his own restaurant, and is the executive chef. He works hard… long hours… every weekend and holiday. His main surf time is early morning… that’s his window. Once the day kicks in he’s working ’till at least 11pm every night. He spends good money hiring good people to run the joint when he’s not there… and even when he is. He’s very successful and has a good life with three kids in a nice house.

    The only real advise I have is you better know your shit in terms food, wine and spirits, and you better be passionate about cooking. If you’re not, you’re getting into it for the wrong reasons, and it will show. If that’s the case, buy into a Jersey Mike’s or something instead.

    #50757

    Yankee
    Grom

    Hey Bass, I’ll reply to your questions here. If you want to PM me that’s probably better. I just want to see you win – – at this stage of my life, it’s satisfying to see my employees, friends, associates, anyone I can share insights with, be winners.

    Grew up poor. And knew it, ’cause it was in a middle-to-upper class zip code. Hated being poor. I don’t want to be poor.

    I never had the advantages. I always had huge capacity for hard work in me, though, and there is a place in this world for hard workers to succeed. Basically, I can’t stand losing, hate it. Always wanted to control my own financial fate. When you don’t have money, other humans control you. John Thompson, the Hoya coach from back in the day, said, “I teach my guys that the only color that matters in America is green.” JT nailed it.

    That guy Kevin O’Leary has decent interviews & such on You Tube. What he says is accurate. Mike Rowe, another solid, insightful set of vids on You Tube.

    When you own your own business, in the beginning it’s a slog. You must work your arse off. You live it, breathe it, sleep it. No kidding, it is your existence. Your sig other better be on board with that, and not just with words – – living it. You learn from your mistakes, and you’re going to make some notable errors.

    So, I graduated with a History degree (useless), never had a plan. Still don’t. All around me @ college, everyone seemed to know what they wanted in life. I had no dream job in mind. Stumbled into a night currency trading desk job, then went soaring up the corp ladder on Wall St. Did really well. I was ‘the next big thing.’ Made a ton of money – – spent every dime of it. After 5 yrs, the stress turned me into burnt toast. Quit. Walked away. Had no plan.

    Brother in DC, working part-time as locksmith whilst in college. Said come on down here, buy this guy’s biz, he wants to retire. Tossed everything in my car, 77 Ford Pinto :), drove to DC. Worked for the old-timer @ 14th & RI Ave, back when it was hookers & homeys in the hood. Now it’s palefaces pushing $1k baby strollers. Still can’t believe how the city changed so fast. Turned out the old feller had no books, and was a POS to boot. Skimming paychecks, racist, a real dick.

    I always had hard work in me, and there is a place in this world for hard workers to succeed. Bailed out. Put ad in Yellow Pages. Ran jobs 24/7/365/ Built customer base. Tons of referrals. People liked my work, they knew I was honest & they liked me. After awhile, the workload was overwhelming. Hired guys to work for me. Lotta alcoholics, druggies, morons. Learned from those HR mistakes.

    I put everything back into the biz. Always bought more service vans, more tools, more stuff to sell. I liked to work, I like money, I don’t want to be poor.

    Here’s what you have to do, at some point, it’s very important. You have to make the break from working in your business to working on your business. You will have to drop the wrenches. Because you cannot do both. Or, I should say you cannot do both well. You will not get to the point of financial freedom if you continue to wrench.

    As well, your body isn’t going to take the punishment at a certain point. That’s just a fact of life, unfortunately.

    You’ll make money. Don’t be ‘that guy’ with the new truck, new boat, whatever, with your initial success money from your hard work. Stay humble & low to the ground, save that money & plow it back into the biz to make more money. The economy will dip at some point, at several points in the years ahead. You don’t want to be making payments on toys when it does. Debt – – use it only to make more money. I.e., take on new service vans because those are revenue platforms.

    Hire good-to-great managers. Hire good schedulers. Watch your overhead like a hawk. Terminate bad employees immediately even if they are generating a lot of revenue for you & even if good Techs are hard to come by. You make the tough decisions. You keep the employees happy-happy. Eventually, if you can avoid the major windows of disaster, it starts to spit money.

    To your query regarding customers – – there’s only 8-12 hours of ‘you’ being able to work every day. Schedule them. If you’re good, they will wait for you. Because there are so many shyster outfits. The scheduling is also important in the sense that it will dictate to you what you need to grow the company. One truck? Three trucks? Outside Sales person? New dispatching software? And so on.

    At your age, you still have the energy & drive & initiative to do this. Trust me, that all fades over time. If you play this correctly, you will be retired @ 50 if you want to be. And still have 20 yrs of good surfing ahead of you at that point. No stress, unless your wife divorced you somewhere along the way.

    Almost all of my friends can’t retire. And some of them are lawyers, doctors, made huge money. College educations, big houses, Range Rovers, pricey vacations, buying tons of stuff, consumer debt (credit cards), put them in the hole. They’re going to be working until they croak.

    My opinion is that it’s better to work hard, work often, while you can (younger years) than to be working because you have to (older years).

    BTW, one of my favorite Jack Nicklaus quotes, to paraphrase, when The Golden Bear was asked if Tiger Woods could break Jack’s records: Jack replied, he can do it as long as he avoids two things, injuries & a bad marriage. Jack wasn’t joking. How prophetic, eh?

    I realize that I rambled a bit here. Hope any of it is some help. As I said, happy to assist, feel free to ask anything. Just like to see hard working people turn out winners.

     

    • Last modifed 5 days, 19 hours ago
    #50758

    Yankee
    Grom

    Bass, it’s different when you work for yourself. You quickly make the correlation that your hard work = compensation.

    Having said that, if what you want is more time off to go surfing, then owning your own biz may not be for you. It’s not for most people. It takes a special breed, and I’m not saying that as some self-congratulatory BS. The biz relentlessly took everything I had in my soul & my wallet, at times, and I almost went bust back in 2009 (Recession). Life is scar tissue.

    You may be able to structure your hours so that you can, say, take mornings to surf. Buddy of mine runs a top auto repair shop here. He runs a lot of tri’s, travels to compete. He’s able to do this because he hired two good mechanics & makes sure they are fat & happy with their jobs. My buddy trains in the mornings, comes in @ 10am, works until about 6pm, no wknds.

    Anyways, there’s variations on the theme that you could try out if you want to.

    #50763

    Hey Bass, I’ll reply to your questions here. If you want to PM me that’s probably better. I just want to see you win – – at this stage of my life, it’s satisfying to see my employees, friends, associates, anyone I can share insights with, be winners. Grew up poor. And knew it, ’cause it was in a middle-to-upper class zip code. Hated being poor. I don’t want to be poor. I never had the advantages. I always had huge capacity for hard work in me, though, and there is a place in this world for hard workers to succeed. Basically, I can’t stand losing, hate it. Always wanted to control my own financial fate. When you don’t have money, other humans control you. John Thompson, the Hoya coach from back in the day, said, “I teach my guys that the only color that matters in America is green.” JT nailed it. That guy Kevin O’Leary has decent interviews & such on You Tube. What he says is accurate. Mike Rowe, another solid, insightful set of vids on You Tube. When you own your own business, in the beginning it’s a slog. You must work your arse off. You live it, breathe it, sleep it. No kidding, it is your existence. Your sig other better be on board with that, and not just with words – – living it. You learn from your mistakes, and you’re going to make some notable errors. So, I graduated with a History degree (useless), never had a plan. Still don’t. All around me @ college, everyone seemed to know what they wanted in life. I had no dream job in mind. Stumbled into a night currency trading desk job, then went soaring up the corp ladder on Wall St. Did really well. I was ‘the next big thing.’ Made a ton of money – – spent every dime of it. After 5 yrs, the stress turned me into burnt toast. Quit. Walked away. Had no plan. Brother in DC, working part-time as locksmith whilst in college. Said come on down here, buy this guy’s biz, he wants to retire. Tossed everything in my car, 77 Ford Pinto :), drove to DC. Worked for the old-timer @ 14th & RI Ave, back when it was hookers & homeys in the hood. Now it’s palefaces pushing $1k baby strollers. Still can’t believe how the city changed so fast. Turned out the old feller had no books, and was a POS to boot. Skimming paychecks, racist, a real dick. I always had hard work in me, and there is a place in this world for hard workers to succeed. Bailed out. Put ad in Yellow Pages. Ran jobs 24/7/365/ Built customer base. Tons of referrals. People liked my work, they knew I was honest & they liked me. After awhile, the workload was overwhelming. Hired guys to work for me. Lotta alcoholics, druggies, morons. Learned from those HR mistakes. I put everything back into the biz. Always bought more service vans, more tools, more stuff to sell. I liked to work, I like money, I don’t want to be poor. Here’s what you have to do, at some point, it’s very important. You have to make the break from working in your business to working on your business. You will have to drop the wrenches. Because you cannot do both. Or, I should say you cannot do both well. You will not get to the point of financial freedom if you continue to wrench. As well, your body isn’t going to take the punishment at a certain point. That’s just a fact of life, unfortunately. You’ll make money. Don’t be ‘that guy’ with the new truck, new boat, whatever, with your initial success money from your hard work. Stay humble & low to the ground, save that money & plow it back into the biz to make more money. The economy will dip at some point, at several points in the years ahead. You don’t want to be making payments on toys when it does. Debt – – use it only to make more money. I.e., take on new service vans because those are revenue platforms. Hire good-to-great managers. Hire good schedulers. Watch your overhead like a hawk. Terminate bad employees immediately even if they are generating a lot of revenue for you & even if good Techs are hard to come by. You make the tough decisions. You keep the employees happy-happy. Eventually, if you can avoid the major windows of disaster, it starts to spit money. To your query regarding customers – – there’s only 8-12 hours of ‘you’ being able to work every day. Schedule them. If you’re good, they will wait for you. Because there are so many shyster outfits. The scheduling is also important in the sense that it will dictate to you what you need to grow the company. One truck? Three trucks? Outside Sales person? New dispatching software? And so on. At your age, you still have the energy & drive & initiative to do this. Trust me, that all fades over time. If you play this correctly, you will be retired @ 50 if you want to be. And still have 20 yrs of good surfing ahead of you at that point. No stress, unless your wife divorced you somewhere along the way. Almost all of my friends can’t retire. And some of them are lawyers, doctors, made huge money. College educations, big houses, Range Rovers, pricey vacations, buying tons of stuff, consumer debt (credit cards), put them in the hole. They’re going to be working until they croak. My opinion is that it’s better to work hard, work often, while you can (younger years) than to be working because you have to (older years). BTW, one of my favorite Jack Nicklaus quotes, to paraphrase, when The Golden Bear was asked if Tiger Woods could break Jack’s records: Jack replied, he can do it as long as he avoids two things, injuries & a bad marriage. Jack wasn’t joking. How prophetic, eh? I realize that I rambled a bit here. Hope any of it is some help. As I said, happy to assist, feel free to ask anything. Just like to see hard working people turn out winners.

    Very well said dude. Bassmon, this is about as good as it gets when it comes to business advise. Listen to Yankee, he’ll steer you in the right direction. If you really want to own your own business, I would follow his advice step-by-step. Just remember one thing, time is limited, how much of it do you want to spend working? How much of it do you want to spend surfing? And how much of it do you want to dedicate to your wife, kids (one day), family, etc.?

    Find a healthy balance at some point but as Yank states, there will not be much balance in the beginning or even for a good 3-5 years, it will be 100% dedication to your business if you want it to succeed. If you play your cards right, you’ll work your way up and can start to enjoy the freedom of being the boss. Do what you want, when you want. Having good people working for you that you can trust is key. If it’s just you as a one man operation then you will hardly ever be able to step away because your income depends on you going to work every day.

    When you have others working for you and they are capable of keeping the place running without too many fires to put out, that’s when you might be able to let off the gas a little bit. And if you want to enjoy your life, I highly advise you have a plan to do just that at some point. All work and no play makes Basson a dull boy lol or something like that.

    #50766

    Yankee
    Grom

    I appreciate all the positive things youse guys mentioned, Waldo, G-Man, DP, Barry the Grom 🙂

    Having said that, to DP’s point about balance, true, there is no balance when you’re running your own show. I stopped being anxious about that right about the time I got divorced from the evil one lol

    I always view biz as an extension of oneself. In that sense, you’re as creative as any artist on the planet, no question. I get to do whatever I want to do every day now, so (knock wood), it doesn’t feel like work anymore, it feels like I’m creating / shaping things.

    btw, your P&L is basically merely a scorecard for the game that you’re playing, that’s all it is. Never any emotion attached to financial aspects. It’s just money.

    I like working, I like not working. If i did all of one thing all of the time, I’d hate that. That’s my balance in Life, I suppose?

    #50770

    Mitchell
    Grom

    Worked for the old-timer @ 14th & RI Ave, back when it was hookers & homeys in the hood. Now it’s palefaces pushing $1k baby strollers. Still can’t believe how the city changed so fast.

    Off topic, but just to say “yeah it has changed!”, the other day I saw a show at the 9:30 club V st. northeast. Hadn’t been to that place in about 20 years. Burned out drug dens now turned into hipster condos.

    If you knew what i’m driving lately this would make more sense but I told my buddy “last time i parked on this street I was scared that my car would be stripped down by the end of the evening, now i’m pissing some guy off for parking my piece of shit vehicle in front of his hip new condo for the evening”

    • Last modifed 5 days, 16 hours ago
    #50772

    ZenSurf69
    Grom

    Didn’t see this thread resurrected here, going through some thoughts in my head. Many of you know im in the HVAC/R field. I like it. I make good money. I can’t complain. But working for someone else is a drag man. I wanted to start my own company at one point but as time goes on, I’m not sure it’s what i want to do. For years iv been messing with the idea of opening a restaurant. The unique places in my area do really well. I service and install equipment in alot of them and have seen the behind the scenes. I think me and my wife could pull it off. She’s a whizz when it comes to creative food and drink ideas. We’re always cooking and refining recipes. I already work on all that kitchen/refrigeration/exhaust equipment. Got a buddy who is a damn good brewer but doesn’t have a legit spot. Thinking of going for broke. Go big or go home. Get a place that has room for my buddy to brew, serve all local and in house beer. Get a chef to work out a menu with my wife. Im not a business man. Would have to figure out what im doing as far as that goes. Just wondering if anyone here has any experience owning a restaurant. I know it’s tough and i won’t be making millions. But if it is successful i could surf whenever. I just turned 30 last month. If i want to live the life i want to live i got to make a move in the near future. Thoughts? Advice? Take the risk? Play it safe and stick with what i got? Anyone in the business with any words of wisdom?

     

     

    Surf

    #50777

    Yankee
    Grom

    Yah, Mitchell, unreal how that area in particular has changed. G-Man likely has plenty of story, too.

    Nobody believes me when I tell them 14th Street was XXX sex shops, hookers, dangerous, a mini Times Square back when Times Square was a pulsating shithole 24/7. 14th Street was where the Marines from Quantico would go on liberty & tear it up. Even Georgetown down by the Bayou trash bar near the river was a heroin shooting gallery.

    Women got abducted every wknd from the parking lots of the nightclubs in SE near where Nats park is now.

    The old signs on the street poles near 14th & K, L, that say ‘no right turn after 9pm’……still there if you look for them. Today’s hipsters don’t know what they mean. Designed to prevent all the suburban dudes from trolling from their cars for streetwalkers, on the endless right turn right turn right turn loops 🙂

    Anyways, apologies for digressing.

    #50789

    Chavez
    Grom

    Bass,

    Open up a washy-washy instead. Get the local dominant MC (Hell’s Angels, Pagans, etc.) to front you the cash. In exchange give them freebies with the girls. They are also there for security. It’s a win-win I tells ya.

    #50793

    ZenSurf69
    Grom

    Bass, Open up a washy-washy instead. Get the local dominant MC (Hell’s Angels, Pagans, etc.) to front you the cash. In exchange give them freebies with the girls. They are also there for security. It’s a win-win I tells ya.

     

    hes right restarauntsing is too dirty of a game….better off with the proletariat motorcycle enthusiast money laundering deal. Just make sure to pay Uncle Sam his and stay humble.

     

    Nasty crowd sometimes.

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