Post Swell Depression

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This topic contains 22 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  DawnPatrol321 3 months ago.

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  • #50120

    So now that the swell has come and gone I feel pretty meh, almost like I have nothing to look forward to tomorrow other than waking up, kissing my wife, and going to work, which are good things to have in my life but surfing daily is an addiction, and once I get in that cycle of waking up and surfing every day or almost every day I am in a totally different mood and mindset, and nothing else can replace that feeling. Once it goes flat, it’s like letting the air out of a balloon.

    Is post swell depression a real thing? Is this why so many surfers do drugs? Man, I was riding high (no pun intended) for quite a while with all the swell in the ocean, even on days where the tide wasn’t exactly right or other obligations got in the way, just knowing there was swell in the water and I could surf if I really wanted to kept me stoked. Now, not so stoked…

    #50121

    I get it bad when i come home from tropical surf trips

    #50122

    Mitchell
    Grom

    I usually get it during really long flat spells, not so much a few days after a good run of swell.

    I can remember a couple of January’s a few years back where the sky went deep blue and the wind blew straight offshore for like 20 days straight. It wasn’t small…it was just flat, and there were no swells on the horizon. It takes me about 10-12 days without surfing before i start getting really obsessed over it.

    #50125

    BassMon
    Grom

    I get it both ways……. wait……

     

    After a run of swell i get so amped that I’ll surf tiny dribbly crap hoping for more swell. It’s usually semi depressing since it’s not as good but at the same time it’s satisfying knowing you milked it till it went flat.

     

    After a two weeks is usually where i start getting really weird and my wife will notice in having withdrawls.

     

    This time however is diffrent. I had a long lay off and only got back in the water the last day of swell. Immediately got amped and ready for more. Im not depressed but almost scared that I’ll have another lay off. Which i know i won’t. A good few days straight will wipe that fear away.

     

    Keep those eyes on the horizon.

    #50128

    Yankee
    Grom

    Living where I live, heck, the no-swell depression, post-swell depression & overall asshat gridlock are depressing.

    Not gonna lie. In years gone by, I’ve driven 3 hrs to TPTSNBN, knowing full well that there will be no surf / blown out surf / flatness. Sat in my beach chair on sand. Consumed a few IPAs, took a nap, drove back to concrete land. Why? Because the ocean is worth it. Because I’m sometimes a desperate hombre.

    It takes about 5 days for a post-CR surf trek buzz to wear off. I’m just speaking at random aka blithering. I’d say post-surf lows are very real.

    #50129

    DP my man, it’s normal … but you may need to take a look in the stoke bank – dude your macking rich there. You seem to get more surfing days than Mitchel who scores like Michael Jordan in the bugs bunny movie… these are the times you take some good not advice advice from Mr Yank and just visit the ocean to see it and say thank you for what it’s given so far. And as a reminder, guys like myself live vicariously surfing because we get swell/time/opportunity to coincide so rarely.😎👍

    #50141

    BarryCuda
    Grom

    Nope, doesn’t affect me. Why?? No surf isn’t something worthy to get down about.

    Then there is paddling–break out the longboard and go for a paddle.

    Then there is bicycling- break out ye old bike. No?? Take a walk, or take a hike in the White Mountains.

    But best of all then there is go play with my granddaughter. Life is too short to get depressed about no surf- surf will come back, the ocean will provide–it always has, it always will. Just keep yourself in shape for when it does get to you.

    #50143

    BassMon
    Grom

    Nope, doesn’t affect me. Why?? No surf isn’t something worthy to get down about. Then there is paddling–break out the longboard and go for a paddle. Then there is bicycling- break out ye old bike. No?? Take a walk, or take a hike in the White Mountains. But best of all then there is go play with my granddaughter. Life is too short to get depressed about no surf- surf will come back, the ocean will provide–it always has, it always will. Just keep yourself in shape for when it does get to you.

     

    Your not wrong. In my recent lay off i was training jujitsu hard, 4 times a week normally. It kept me occupied, in shape, and focused.

    But it was no replacement for surfing. My normal day to day i was happy and feeling good. But the second id walk into my board room or get reminded of surfing in anyway… it’d hit me. The realization that it’s been awhile since i rode a wave would set in and that wasn’t a good feeling. Without other hobbies i would of gone crazy for sure, keeping occupied does help. But there’s always that itch to surf and the only cure is to scratch it.

    #50150

    Alright guys i’m feeling a little better today. The combination of driving to the beach yesterday with my LB ready to go and then turning around and going home when I found the tide was already too deep at my go-to spot combined with seeing the upcoming dismal forecast had me a little bummed coming off such a good run of swell. Like a sugar high or caffeine high that wore off and then I crashed. I’m good though. I just didn’t want it to end is all.

    I too have other things I like to do when there are no waves, and I will do those things, but like I said before, none of those things can replace the feeling of surfing, and I mean nothing. I wasn’t fortunate enough to grow up on the East Coast or in Puerto Rico or out on the West Coast etc., and my parents didn’t have money to travel and expose me to surfing so I’m not spoiled or burnt out on it after decades of non-stop surfing like some folks are.

    See, I grew up in the Dunedin / Clearwater area on the West Coast of Florida and picked up my first surfboard at 15 years old and started surfing Gulf slop and then when I got my 1st car at 16 I was finally able to make the long drives to the East Coast to surf Cocoa Beach and surrounding beaches. It was then I became addicted to surfing. Unfortunately I didn’t have the financial means to make the trip often enough to really progress and become a competent surfer like I am today. Sure I rode some waves here and there but when I got a good one it was mostly luck not skill.

    It wasn’t until I hit my late 20’s when I started making enough money that I started making those East Coast trips regularly and was able to progress and really surf the way I had always dreamed about. But I wasn’t satisfied with being a weekend warrior. When I hit 30 I realized time was limited on this Earth and I didn’t want to die without ever becoming the kind of surfer I longed to be. I felt there was more to life than just going to work and coming home and hanging out with friends / family and doing my typical hobbies. Those things are nice but I felt a void in my life, something was missing. Every time I would get a chance to surf I would feel something I never felt doing anything else in my life. Nothing makes me feel alive like being in the ocean and feeling that energy. It’s hard to explain, but i’m trying my best to do so.

    Anyways, I made a commitment to myself to make surfing and the ocean a major part of my life and it was then I started making life decisions to build my life around surfing. To some that may sound stupid, but to me it meant everything in the world to me. I longed for the daily surfing lifestyle, not just to surf on occasion, that just wasn’t enough for me. I needed more. I didn’t care about competition or even being a local ripper, I just wanted, no, I needed to surf and have access to the ocean on a daily basis. I use to read the forums and would be envious of the guys talking about their sessions every day and would day dream about that being me one day. Checking surf forecasts knowing I wouldn’t be able to enjoy the conditions on tap that day. Watching web cams from work and getting lost in my daydreams and not getting any work done because I couldn’t focus. The ocean was calling me, like a magnetic pull, and I wouldn’t be satisfied until I could have it. Nobody understood it but me it seemed. My wife didn’t get it, my parents didn’t get it, only a committed surfer who feels the same way could understand it.

    So many people go through their lives having nothing they are truly passionate about, something that makes them feel alive, something that gets them up early in the morning and gets them excited, a pursuit, an adventure, a lifestyle. No job or career can fill that void. Nothing can, it’s something that can’t be matched. To me that’s how I feel. When I’m out in the ocean paddling around or staring at the horizon or dropping in on a wave I feel a sense of fulfillment that I don’t feel any other time. When I walk back up the beach after a session I always thank God for the ocean and what it has provided me. Others surfers may not have that same connection and may not feel it’s as important to them and their life, but to me it is every bit that important. I am the best version of myself today compared to my past self because of surfing and the dedication and pursuit that I have committed to.

    Some of you may recall me making the 2-3hr drive, 5-6hrs round trip every single weekend without fail, good or bad waves and the occasional after work Gulf slop session 45 minutes from work and an hour and 15 minutes home, it didn’t matter, I was on the road and I was going to be in the ocean. I did that consistently for a good 5-6 years until I was finally in a position to relocate to the East coast with my wife, which took quite a bit of convincing and there were a lot of hurdles to get over to get here. I jeopardized my career, my marriage, relationships with family, etc., I put it all one the line to make my dream a reality, and once I made the decision to move here, nothing was going to stop me, not one person, no matter how important they were to me, I had to be selfish this one time in my life or I would have regretted it for the rest of my life.

    You guys have no idea the struggle, but when the dream was finally a reality I did not take it for granted. We have been living in Melbourne for over 4 years now, in the beginning of our 5th year and I remember our first day here and how I literally kissed the ground of the house we are renting, just overwhelmed and thankful to have finally made my dream a reality, something I wanted almost my entire life. It didn’t take very long for my wife to notice a difference in me and our relationship has never been better, and she has never been happier (her words) than she is now. My life feels complete now, and with the addition of our daughter coming in February I will be beyond stoked. Life couldn’t be better. So when I get a little emotional about the ocean and surfing, this is why. I will never take this place or surfing for granted.

    • Last modifed 3 months ago
    #50154

    Alright guys i’m feeling a little better today. The combination of driving to the beach yesterday with my LB ready to go and then turning around and going home when I found the tide was already too deep at my go-to spot combined with seeing the upcoming dismal forecast had me a little bummed coming off such a good run of swell. Like a sugar high or caffeine high that wore off and then I crashed. I’m good though. I just didn’t want it to end is all.

    I too have other things I like to do when there are no waves, and I will do those things, but like I said before, none of those things can replace the feeling of surfing, and I mean nothing. I wasn’t fortunate enough to grow up on the East Coast or in Puerto Rico or out on the West Coast etc., and my parents didn’t have money to travel and expose me to surfing so I’m not spoiled or burnt out on it after decades of non-stop surfing like some folks are.

    See, I grew up in the Dunedin / Clearwater area on the West Coast of Florida and picked up my first surfboard at 15 years old and started surfing Gulf slop and then when I got my 1st car at 16 I was finally able to make the long drives to the East Coast to surf Cocoa Beach and surrounding beaches. It was then I became addicted to surfing. Unfortunately I didn’t have the financial means to make the trip often enough to really progress and become a competent surfer like I am today. Sure I rode some waves here and there but when I got a good one it was mostly luck not skill.

    It wasn’t until I hit my late 20’s when I started making enough money that I started making those East Coast trips regularly and was able to progress and really surf the way I had always dreamed about. But I wasn’t satisfied with being a weekend warrior. When I hit 30 I realized time was limited on this Earth and I didn’t want to die without ever becoming the kind of surfer I longed to be. I felt there was more to life than just going to work and coming home and hanging out with friends / family and doing my typical hobbies. Those things are nice but I felt a void in my life, something was missing. Every time I would get a chance to surf I would feel something I never felt doing anything else in my life. Nothing makes me feel alive like being in the ocean and feeling that energy. It’s hard to explain, but i’m trying my best to do so.

    Anyways, I made a commitment to myself to make surfing and the ocean a major part of my life and it was then I started making life decisions to build my life around surfing. To some that may sound stupid, but to me it meant everything in the world to me. I longed for the daily surfing lifestyle, not just to surf on occasion, that just wasn’t enough for me. I needed more. I didn’t care about competition or even being a local ripper, I just wanted, no, I needed to surf and have access to the ocean on a daily basis. I use to read the forums and would be envious of the guys talking about their sessions every day and would day dream about that being me one day. Checking surf forecasts knowing I wouldn’t be able to enjoy the conditions on tap that day. Watching web cams from work and getting lost in my daydreams and not getting any work done because I couldn’t focus. The ocean was calling me, like a magnetic pull, and I wouldn’t be satisfied until I could have it. Nobody understood it but me it seemed. My wife didn’t get it, my parents didn’t get it, only a committed surfer who feels the same way could understand it.

    So many people go through their lives having nothing they are truly passionate about, something that makes them feel alive, something that gets them up early in the morning and gets them excited, a pursuit, an adventure, a lifestyle. No job or career can fill that void. Nothing can, it’s something that can’t be matched. To me that’s how I feel. When I’m out in the ocean paddling around or staring at the horizon or dropping in on a wave I feel a sense of fulfillment that I don’t feel any other time. When I walk back up the beach after a session I always thank God for the ocean and what it has provided me. Others surfers may not have that same connection and may not feel it’s as important to them and their life, but to me it is every bit that important. I am the best version of myself today compared to my past self because of surfing and the dedication and pursuit that I have committed to.

    Some of you may recall me making the 2-3hr drive, 5-6hrs round trip every single weekend without fail, good or bad waves and the occasional after work Gulf slop session 45 minutes from work and an hour and 15 minutes home, it didn’t matter, I was on the road and I was going to be in the ocean. I did that consistently for a good 5-6 years until I was finally in a position to relocate to the East coast with my wife, which took quite a bit of convincing and there were a lot of hurdles to get over to get here. I jeopardized my career, my marriage, relationships with family, etc., I put it all one the line to make my dream a reality, and once I made the decision to move here, nothing was going to stop me, not one person, no matter how important they were to me, I had to be selfish this one time in my life or I would have regretted it for the rest of my life.

    You guys have no idea the struggle, but when the dream was finally a reality I did not take it for granted. We have been living in Melbourne for over 4 years now, in the beginning of our 5th year and I remember our first day here and how I literally kissed the ground of the house we are renting, just overwhelmed and thankful to have finally made my dream a reality, something I wanted almost my entire life. It didn’t take very long for my wife to notice a difference in me and our relationship has never been better, and she has never been happier (her words) than she is now. My life feels complete now, and with the addition of our daughter coming in February I will be beyond stoked. Life couldn’t be better. So when I get a little emotional about the ocean and surfing, this is why. I will never take this place or surfing for granted.

     

    #50156

    Alright guys, I’m feeling a little better today. The combination of driving to the beach yesterday with my LB all ready to go and then turning around and going home when I found the tide was already too deep at my go-to spot combined with seeing the upcoming dismal forecast had me a little bummed coming off such a good run of swell. Like a sugar high or caffeine high that wore off and then I crashed. I’m good though. I just didn’t want it to end is all.

    I too have other things I like to do when there are no waves, and I will do those things, but like I said before, none of those things can replace the feeling of surfing, and I mean nothing. I wasn’t fortunate enough to grow up on the East Coast or in Puerto Rico or out on the West Coast etc., and my parents didn’t have money to travel and expose me to surfing so I’m not spoiled or burnt out on it after decades of non-stop surfing like some folks are.

    See, I grew up in the Dunedin / Clearwater area on the West Coast of Florida and picked up my first surfboard at 15 years old and started surfing Gulf slop and then when I got my 1st car at 16 I was finally able to make the long drives to the East Coast to surf Cocoa Beach and surrounding beaches. It was then I became addicted to surfing. Unfortunately I didn’t have the financial means to make the trip often enough to really progress and become a competent surfer like I am today. Sure I rode some waves here and there but when I got a good one it was mostly luck not skill.

    It wasn’t until I hit my late 20’s when I started making enough money that I started making those East Coast trips regularly and was able to progress and really surf the way I had always dreamed about. But I wasn’t satisfied with being a weekend warrior. When I hit 30 I realized time was limited on this Earth and I didn’t want to die without ever becoming the kind of surfer I longed to be. I felt there was more to life than just going to work and coming home and hanging out with friends / family and doing my typical hobbies. Those things are nice but I felt a void in my life, something was missing. Every time I would get a chance to surf I would feel something I never felt doing anything else in my life. Nothing makes me feel alive like being in the ocean and feeling that energy. It’s hard to explain, but i’m trying my best to do so.

    Anyways, I made a commitment to myself to make surfing and the ocean a major part of my life and it was then I started making life decisions to build my life around surfing. To some that may sound stupid, but to me it meant everything in the world to me. I longed for the daily surfing lifestyle, not just to surf on occasion, that just wasn’t enough for me. I needed more. I didn’t care about competition or even being a local ripper, I just wanted, no, I needed to surf and have access to the ocean on a daily basis. I use to read the forums and would be envious of the guys talking about their sessions every day and would day dream about that being me one day. Checking surf forecasts knowing I wouldn’t be able to enjoy the conditions on tap that day. Watching web cams from work and getting lost in my daydreams and not getting any work done because I couldn’t focus. The ocean was calling me, like a magnetic pull, and I wouldn’t be satisfied until I could have it. Nobody understood it but me it seemed. My wife didn’t get it, my parents didn’t get it, only a committed surfer who feels the same way could understand it.

    So many people go through their lives having nothing they are truly passionate about, something that makes them feel alive, something that gets them up early in the morning and gets them excited, a pursuit, an adventure, a lifestyle. No job or career can fill that void. Nothing can, it’s something that can’t be matched. To me that’s how I feel. When I’m out in the ocean paddling around or staring at the horizon or dropping in on a wave I feel a sense of fulfillment that I don’t feel any other time. When I walk back up the beach after a session I always thank God for the ocean and what it has provided me. Others surfers may not have that same connection and may not feel it’s as important to them and their life, but to me it is every bit that important. I am the best version of myself today compared to my past self because of surfing and the dedication and pursuit that I have committed to.

    Some of you may recall me making the 2-3hr drive, 5-6hrs round trip every single weekend without fail, good or bad waves and the occasional after work Gulf slop session 45 minutes from work and an hour and 15 minutes home, it didn’t matter, I was on the road and I was going to be in the ocean. I did that consistently for a good 5-6 years until I was finally in a position to relocate to the East coast with my wife, which took quite a bit of convincing and there were a lot of hurdles to get over to get here. I jeopardized my career, my marriage, relationships with family, etc., I put it all one the line to make my dream a reality, and once I made the decision to move here, nothing was going to stop me, not one person, no matter how important they were to me, I had to be selfish this one time in my life or I would have regretted it for the rest of my life.

    You guys have no idea the struggle, but when the dream was finally a reality I did not take it for granted. We have been living in Melbourne for over 4 years now, in the beginning of our 5th year and I remember our first day here and how I literally kissed the ground of the house we are renting, just overwhelmed and thankful to have finally made my dream a reality, something I wanted almost my entire life. It didn’t take very long for my wife to notice a difference in me and our relationship has never been better, and she has never been happier (her words) than she is now. My life feels complete now, and with the addition of our daughter coming in February I will be beyond stoked. Life couldn’t be better. So when I get a little emotional about the ocean and surfing, this is why. I will never take this place or surfing for granted.

    #50159

    powder days on the snowboard=surfing

     

    #50166

    BassMon
    Grom

    Alright guys, I’m feeling a little better today. The combination of driving to the beach yesterday with my LB all ready to go and then turning around and going home when I found the tide was already too deep at my go-to spot combined with seeing the upcoming dismal forecast had me a little bummed coming off such a good run of swell. Like a sugar high or caffeine high that wore off and then I crashed. I’m good though. I just didn’t want it to end is all. I too have other things I like to do when there are no waves, and I will do those things, but like I said before, none of those things can replace the feeling of surfing, and I mean nothing. I wasn’t fortunate enough to grow up on the East Coast or in Puerto Rico or out on the West Coast etc., and my parents didn’t have money to travel and expose me to surfing so I’m not spoiled or burnt out on it after decades of non-stop surfing like some folks are. See, I grew up in the Dunedin / Clearwater area on the West Coast of Florida and picked up my first surfboard at 15 years old and started surfing Gulf slop and then when I got my 1st car at 16 I was finally able to make the long drives to the East Coast to surf Cocoa Beach and surrounding beaches. It was then I became addicted to surfing. Unfortunately I didn’t have the financial means to make the trip often enough to really progress and become a competent surfer like I am today. Sure I rode some waves here and there but when I got a good one it was mostly luck not skill. It wasn’t until I hit my late 20’s when I started making enough money that I started making those East Coast trips regularly and was able to progress and really surf the way I had always dreamed about. But I wasn’t satisfied with being a weekend warrior. When I hit 30 I realized time was limited on this Earth and I didn’t want to die without ever becoming the kind of surfer I longed to be. I felt there was more to life than just going to work and coming home and hanging out with friends / family and doing my typical hobbies. Those things are nice but I felt a void in my life, something was missing. Every time I would get a chance to surf I would feel something I never felt doing anything else in my life. Nothing makes me feel alive like being in the ocean and feeling that energy. It’s hard to explain, but i’m trying my best to do so. Anyways, I made a commitment to myself to make surfing and the ocean a major part of my life and it was then I started making life decisions to build my life around surfing. To some that may sound stupid, but to me it meant everything in the world to me. I longed for the daily surfing lifestyle, not just to surf on occasion, that just wasn’t enough for me. I needed more. I didn’t care about competition or even being a local ripper, I just wanted, no, I needed to surf and have access to the ocean on a daily basis. I use to read the forums and would be envious of the guys talking about their sessions every day and would day dream about that being me one day. Checking surf forecasts knowing I wouldn’t be able to enjoy the conditions on tap that day. Watching web cams from work and getting lost in my daydreams and not getting any work done because I couldn’t focus. The ocean was calling me, like a magnetic pull, and I wouldn’t be satisfied until I could have it. Nobody understood it but me it seemed. My wife didn’t get it, my parents didn’t get it, only a committed surfer who feels the same way could understand it. So many people go through their lives having nothing they are truly passionate about, something that makes them feel alive, something that gets them up early in the morning and gets them excited, a pursuit, an adventure, a lifestyle. No job or career can fill that void. Nothing can, it’s something that can’t be matched. To me that’s how I feel. When I’m out in the ocean paddling around or staring at the horizon or dropping in on a wave I feel a sense of fulfillment that I don’t feel any other time. When I walk back up the beach after a session I always thank God for the ocean and what it has provided me. Others surfers may not have that same connection and may not feel it’s as important to them and their life, but to me it is every bit that important. I am the best version of myself today compared to my past self because of surfing and the dedication and pursuit that I have committed to. Some of you may recall me making the 2-3hr drive, 5-6hrs round trip every single weekend without fail, good or bad waves and the occasional after work Gulf slop session 45 minutes from work and an hour and 15 minutes home, it didn’t matter, I was on the road and I was going to be in the ocean. I did that consistently for a good 5-6 years until I was finally in a position to relocate to the East coast with my wife, which took quite a bit of convincing and there were a lot of hurdles to get over to get here. I jeopardized my career, my marriage, relationships with family, etc., I put it all one the line to make my dream a reality, and once I made the decision to move here, nothing was going to stop me, not one person, no matter how important they were to me, I had to be selfish this one time in my life or I would have regretted it for the rest of my life. You guys have no idea the struggle, but when the dream was finally a reality I did not take it for granted. We have been living in Melbourne for over 4 years now, in the beginning of our 5th year and I remember our first day here and how I literally kissed the ground of the house we are renting, just overwhelmed and thankful to have finally made my dream a reality, something I wanted almost my entire life. It didn’t take very long for my wife to notice a difference in me and our relationship has never been better, and she has never been happier (her words) than she is now. My life feels complete now, and with the addition of our daughter coming in February I will be beyond stoked. Life couldn’t be better. So when I get a little emotional about the ocean and surfing, this is why. I will never take this place or surfing for granted.

     

    First off, i knew most of your story but never realized you got into surfing as late in life as you did. Good on you man.

     

    But i will say, trust me, i think most can understand your struggle. Sure i didn’t grow up hours from the beach. But my parents also weren’t my personal taxi drivers. I remember as a kid finding anyway possible to get to the beach. Sometimes that meant walking which was quite a few miles. Sometimes getting dropped off, before my parents went to work, at the beach 5 or 6 in the morning with nothing but a board. Wouldn’t get picked up till 6 or 7 at night. No food, no water, no cash, no nothing. Boy me and my buddy would find anyway possible. Mow a stranger’s lawn for a ride. Steal one of our sisters cars (before being old enough for a permit). Whatever.

     

    It’s crazy, i was actually just talking to someone about this today. I don’t surf because it’s fun. I got into it because it was fun. But now it’s somthing else. You describe it one way. I describe it another. Someone else will describe it another way. But it’s all the same. It’s a need. A magnetic pull as you put it. That’s not to say surfing isn’t fun. It is. But especially here up north, winter, cold, not fun. Yet we go. Because there’s a wave to surf. Small onshore days….. got to go, what if there’s a random good one. Had a late night, long week, 3 hours of sleep? Got to go, there’s waves.

     

    My wife is the one who pointed it out to me. She knows how important it is for me to surf because she sees the positive effect it has of me mentally. It’s the one thing she will never give me a hard time about. No surf, I’m not happy, which means she’s dealing with my cranky ass.

     

    But yeah man. I just find it crazy how we all come from diffrent places, have diffrent stories, diffrent ages we started. All that. And we all describe it our own way because there is no word for it. Some guy who grew up on the west coast of FL far from surf, and some other guy who grew up just miles away, and another who didn’t get into it till his 40s 50s or 60s. We all can relate and all have experienced the same thing, no matter how diffrent our stories are.

     

    Nothing else like it.

    #50188

    DP and BassMon, interesting to hear your stories and I can definitely relate to parts of each. I grew up a mile from the beach but my parents/friends were not beach people so it wasn’t until high school and shortly before I got my drivers’ license that I even really became aware of surfing as something people did in NJ. Then had many years where I alternated periods of obsession with periods of living away from the beach, it wasn’t until I moved back to NJ from CO 4 years ago that I really had a multi-year period of surfing pretty much every swell year round and graduating from total kook to partial kook. Similar to your situations, my wife will generally go out of her way to make sure I can surf as much as possible when there are waves, because she sees first hand the change in personality when I go a while without it.

    That said, I don’t really get an immediate post-swell hangover. Typically after several good days in a row I’m usually pretty surfed out and ready for a day off in order to let my body rest, catch up on sleep, and take care of whatever responsibilities I’ve been slacking on in order to surf as much as I can. Of course that’s because we rarely get a week plus run of decent waves, so instead of surfing for an hour or two every morning, I binge as hard as I can for 1-3 days until I’m completely exhausted and can’t lift my arms above my head. I do wonder what it’d be like to live somewhere that’s more consistent on a day to day basis, where it’s realistic and feasible to surf for an hour or two literally every single day and get into that pattern. Even living a mile from the beach in NJ, I wouldn’t say it’s anywhere near consistent enough to live that sort of lifestyle, though even just being able to see the ocean has a positive impact on my mental health.

    I definitely get depressed during long flat spells. And the worst part is it creeps up on me and I don’t even really notice. Or I notice somethings off but weirdly I never realize why… even though I can look back historically and see a very clear correlation between mood and swell, it’s never my first assumption. And when it gets bad it gets to the point that I don’t even proactively feel like surfing and assume I don’t care.

    This summer was the worst I’ve ever experienced… I only surfed 2 or 3 times between memorial day and labor day and none were better than maybe thigh high. The whole second half of the summer is a complete blur and I just remember being completely miserable. I honestly couldn’t tell you what I did, like I blacked it out. I didn’t surf, I didn’t really mountain bike to speak of, I wasn’t going to the gym with any consistency (or maybe I was but there was no logic or progression behind what I was doing there), I didn’t take any trips or vacations… I’m pretty sure I went to work because I’m still employed and stuff that had been assigned to me all got done, but it was weird. And then, when the first halfway decent swell in a couple months came through in late August, I wasn’t able to paddle out because my car had died the weekend before and I hadn’t had a chance to go car shopping yet… and I honestly didn’t even care. I’d been so completely miserable for so long that I felt no desire to surf, like I couldn’t imagine it making me feel better cause I couldn’t imagine anything making me feel better. Theoretically I could’ve rented a car but rationalized it as work was really heavy that week plus it wasn’t really good enough to justify the expense/hassle of doing that, just better than it had been. It was bizarre. Fortunately the Dorian swell came through on a weekend, when my wife and daughter happened to be out of town so I literally had nothing else to do but surf all day, which made it enough of a no brainer to get me back out there. And then things pretty fell into place mentally in very short order after that (even though I really only got one decent size session and spent the majority of it taking waves on the head while trying to make it outside).

    As much as I hated my last job, one of the upsides was that my best friend since high school also worked there, so inevitably we’d spend some time talking in his office most days. And every single time I’d start to slide toward a generally shitty or grumpy or depressed mood, or simply not being 100% stoked/excited about life like I typically am, the first thing he’d ask me is when I last surfed. Invariably, it would’ve been more than week (either we were in the midst of a flat spell, or there’d been a real short window of waves recently that I was unable to get out during). Even my wife isn’t that good a identifying the cause and effect the minute I start to slide in the wrong direction, though she fundamentally understands there’s a very direct correlation and vastly prefers being around regularly-surfing me (really doesn’t even like non-surfing me at all to speak of, to be perfectly honest).

    • Last modifed 3 months ago
    #50193

    BarryCuda
    Grom

    Depressed?? Maybe you morons all need to go see a psychiatrist. What are you?? Men, or mice??

    hahahahahaha!!!

    #50195

    LBCrew
    Grom

    For me, the more I surf, the more I want to surf… and longer I go not surfing, the easier it gets.

    I guess when I surf for a few days, it becomes… addictive? Probably not the right word. Habitual would be better. Then, when the swell is over I really miss it. But then, as the flat spell ensues, I slowly become accustomed to the change in routine until it’s pretty much off my mind. By then I’ve found something else to fill my time and scratch the itch that’s left behind. Which is probably some kind of autonomic mental health defense mechanism, really.

    #50196

    For me, the more I surf, the more I want to surf… and longer I go not surfing, the easier it gets. I guess when I surf for a few days, it becomes… addictive? Probably not the right word. Habitual would be better. Then, when the swell is over I really miss it. But then, as the flat spell ensues, I slowly become accustomed to the change in routine until it’s pretty much off my mind. By then I’ve found something else to fill my time and scratch the itch that’s left behind. Which is probably some kind of autonomic mental health defense mechanism, really.

    Exactly! That first day of not surfing after a long run of swell and being on it every day is hard, breaking that habit sucks, but the next day it gets a little easier and so forth, but right around 7-10 days is when I start getting antsy and impatient again and start jonesing for a wave, any wave, big or small. Each day after that I start wondering when I’ll ever surf again, and if the flat spell goes on too long then you kind of accept it for a little while but then you don’t want to accept it at some point and that’s when I start wondering if I’m still a surfer lol Luckily, it’s consistent enough around here that I don’t have to go tooooo long before I get another wave even in the worst part of summer, you just have to be willing to go out on the barely rideable days to get through to the next swell. Something is better than nothing during those times.

    #50197

    BassMon
    Grom

    For me, the more I surf, the more I want to surf… and longer I go not surfing, the easier it gets. I guess when I surf for a few days, it becomes… addictive? Probably not the right word. Habitual would be better. Then, when the swell is over I really miss it. But then, as the flat spell ensues, I slowly become accustomed to the change in routine until it’s pretty much off my mind. By then I’ve found something else to fill my time and scratch the itch that’s left behind. Which is probably some kind of autonomic mental health defense mechanism, really.

    Exactly! That first day of not surfing after a long run of swell and being on it every day is hard, breaking that habit sucks, but the next day it gets a little easier and so forth, but right around 7-10 days is when I start getting antsy and impatient again and start jonesing for a wave, any wave, big or small. Each day after that I start wondering when I’ll ever surf again, and if the flat spell goes on too long then you kind of accept it for a little while but then you don’t want to accept it at some point and that’s when I start wondering if I’m still a surfer lol Luckily, it’s consistent enough around here that I don’t have to go tooooo long before I get another wave even in the worst part of summer, you just have to be willing to go out on the barely rideable days to get through to the next swell. Something is better than nothing during those times.

     

    I enjoy those days that are barley rideable or worth it. It’s almost like a test for me. Ok it’s small and the tide is killing it, but if i can some how muster up enough speed to do a half way decent top turn or cutback id be happy. Being able to do anything in those conditions is an accomplishment.

     

    On another note, this may relate to this thread. I read an article a few years back. Either on surfline or maybe surfer mag. I think it was called “blue mind”. It was basically describing a theory. Jist being we instinctually want to be near water because back before plumbing we needed a water source to live. Said it releases endorphins or whatever and used that to explain the unique joy surfers and other water enthusiasts seem to get.

    #50198

    First off, i knew most of your story but never realized you got into surfing as late in life as you did. Good on you man. But i will say, trust me, i think most can understand your struggle. Sure i didn’t grow up hours from the beach. But my parents also weren’t my personal taxi drivers. I remember as a kid finding anyway possible to get to the beach. Sometimes that meant walking which was quite a few miles. Sometimes getting dropped off, before my parents went to work, at the beach 5 or 6 in the morning with nothing but a board. Wouldn’t get picked up till 6 or 7 at night. No food, no water, no cash, no nothing. Boy me and my buddy would find anyway possible. Mow a stranger’s lawn for a ride. Steal one of our sisters cars (before being old enough for a permit). Whatever. It’s crazy, i was actually just talking to someone about this today. I don’t surf because it’s fun. I got into it because it was fun. But now it’s somthing else. You describe it one way. I describe it another. Someone else will describe it another way. But it’s all the same. It’s a need. A magnetic pull as you put it. That’s not to say surfing isn’t fun. It is. But especially here up north, winter, cold, not fun. Yet we go. Because there’s a wave to surf. Small onshore days….. got to go, what if there’s a random good one. Had a late night, long week, 3 hours of sleep? Got to go, there’s waves. My wife is the one who pointed it out to me. She knows how important it is for me to surf because she sees the positive effect it has of me mentally. It’s the one thing she will never give me a hard time about. No surf, I’m not happy, which means she’s dealing with my cranky ass. But yeah man. I just find it crazy how we all come from diffrent places, have diffrent stories, diffrent ages we started. All that. And we all describe it our own way because there is no word for it. Some guy who grew up on the west coast of FL far from surf, and some other guy who grew up just miles away, and another who didn’t get into it till his 40s 50s or 60s. We all can relate and all have experienced the same thing, no matter how diffrent our stories are. Nothing else like it.

    Thanks, I don’t know if I would say I got into surfing late in life but it definitely took a while to get fully committed to it. Where I grew up I was only 30 minutes to Clearwater Beach, and my parents would take me on the weekends as a child but never saw anybody surfing there. Most of the beach is swimmers only, I didn’t know there were waves or surfers just down the road at certain spots until I was a teenager. I think I was 14-15 when I first paddled on a friends surfboard. I was a skateboarder first, so surfing seemed like a logical thing to do on the water. Once I paddled my friends board I decided I would get one too and after saving up a few paychecks I got my own.

    From age 15-21 I probably surfed 10-15 times per year. Almost always from some type of storm in the Gulf and then a couple times a year we would all take a trip to Cocoa Beach.

    From 21-23 years old I didn’t do much surfing. I got caught up in trying to become “successful” and was chasing money but it didn’t take long for me to realize I was headed down the wrong path to happiness.

    My buddy who I met at work had just gotten into surfing and I told him that like to surf too but that I had destroyed my only board a while back so I ended up going and getting a new one to make the East Coast trips and Gulf session with him. So that’s when I started realizing that I was a surfer and will always be a surfer no matter what.

    From the age of 23-28 I would surf probably 20-25 times per year. Then I stepped up the commitment level and was on it every weekend and sometimes during the week whenever waves were available.

    The 5-6 years leading up to relocating to the East Coast I was surfing more than some locals because I was so dedicated. And the last 4 years I have surfed probably close to 180-200 times a year. It’s been a part of my life since 15 years old with the exception of a couple years and it has progressively become more important year after year since then. I just wish I had committed earlier is all.

    At 38 I am just scratching the surface of what I’m capable of but I have come a long way in terms of my development. No I’m not a ripper but who cares. I only really care about surfing often as possible.

    #50199

    Depressed?? Maybe you morons all need to go see a psychiatrist. What are you?? Men, or mice?? hahahahahaha!!!

     

    O Barry’s right. SNowflake shit.

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